Four Ways to Use Sheet Protectors in the Classroom


One of the supplies I always have on hand in the classroom is sheet protectors. They are durable, affordable, versatile, and easy to use which is a win-win situation in my book. Here are four ways I have used them in my classroom.





Sheet protectors are the perfect way to provide repeated practice for students while keeping your copy numbers low. If you use cardstock paper or place papers back-to-back, the sheet protector becomes more durable. I rarely have to replace them during the school year! I often put math games and spelling worksheets inside.




 Sheet protectors are an easy way to put posters on display that can easily be changed out all year long. Once they are attached to a bulletin board or wall, you can insert your classroom goals, student art work, inspirational quotes, reading skills for a focus wall, and more! You can even insert your classroom store poster where the date can be changed on a regular basis.


When I started teaching in the primary grades, I began collecting work samples throughout the year to be placed in a portfolio. This was a binder filled with student work that demonstrated growth throughout the school year along with photos to remember special events and activities. Sheet protectors were the easiest way to add student photos, bulky projects, and art pieces to the binder without punching holes through them.



I have been fortunate to work in a school where whiteboards are provided for every student to use. If you don't have whiteboards and need an inexpensive way to make a class set quickly, you should definitely look into sheet protectors. By inserting cardstock paper, you can instantly create a 2-sided work space for students. These are also smaller and quieter than whiteboards!

You can find sheet protectors in just about any store that sells school or office supplies. I've tried several brands, but I keep coming back for these ones.
Avery Premium Heavyweight Sheet Protectors

What are your favorite ways to use sheet protectors in the classroom?


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